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Motivation at the Workplace as an Organization Practice

Words: 2787
Paper Type: Essay
Subject: Management

Introduction

One of the most important management processes is managing employees. Understanding workers and their significant contribution to organization success is critical for managers. In essence, there is an identity between the organization and the human element.

In properly managed organizations, employees are perceived as an important resource that immensely contributes to the enhanced productivity and quality (Vinokur et al., 2004). In fact, in such organizations, employees are considered fundamental for organization development.

Capital investments come second and are seen as a means through which employees can achieve the organization goals.

The effectiveness of the organization is measured by the extent to which it achieves its goals. In the circumstances where the organization values its human resources, it will become effective through inculcating the sense of corporation among employees (Vinokur et al., 2004).

Also, the organization must ensure that there is motivation, commitment and job satisfaction within its jurisdiction.

For the organization to ensure that there are job commitment and satisfaction among its employees it must put in place effective and strong motivating factors at all levels within its structure.

This paper will be focusing on the motivation as an organization practice particularly in the education setting. The discussion will center on how motivation leads to job satisfaction and commitment among the personnel within the academic institutions.

Drawing from motivation theories, first, the paper will discuss motivation and then how academic institutions motivate their personnel. The paper will finally discuss how motivation leads to job commitment and satisfaction.

Motivation, job satisfaction, and organization commitment practices

Motivation is a psychosomatic course of action (Vinokur et al, 2004). Within the setting of an organization, any form of competition seems to be motivational in nature. An incentive makes workers feel motivated and by extension become competitive.

Together with other forms of psychological processes including mindset, individuality, perception, and knowledge, motivation is a critical component of organizational conduct. However, the organization conduct cannot be explained singly by motivation (Vinokur et al, 2004).

Within the organization, motivation works together and operate in combination with other forms of psychosomatic processes. Together, they explain the organization behavior.

The organization behavior is explained by the general conduct of individual employees (Lifer, 2004). Thus, motivation is an individual process.

To understand motivation as an organization practice, other psychosomatic processes that govern behavior must also be understood.

The reason is that motivation together with other psychological processes such as perception and attitude work together in the determination of the individual behavior (Sinclair et al., 2005).

As indicated, motivation should not be understood as the only way through which employees’ behavior within an organization could be explained. Motivation acts together with other interlinking processes within the organization environment.

The behavior that motivation causes is what can be observed and not motivation. Thus, emphasizing on the organization behavior helps in understanding the greater role motivation plays (Sinclair et al., 2005).

Among the organization practices, the importance of motivation can be understood by the relationships between the organization and the worker’s desires or needs.

In some instances, motivation within an organization is described by the incentives the organization offer to the workers.

In essence, motivation as an organization practice can be understood by deriving the relationship between the employee’s desires, needs as well as the incentives the organization provides.

In other words, motivations involve the interaction between the mutually supporting essentials, drives, needs, and incentives.

As a management process, motivation influences individual behavior depending on the knowledge of the individual needs (Lifer, 2004).

Essentially, motivation deals with the variety of conscious human behavior that is found between the spectrums of instinctive actions to those activities that are learned.

Within the organization setting, Vinokur, Jayaaratne, and Chess (2004) argue that motivation deals with processes that stimulate, invigorates, expresses and protracts conduct and performance.

In other words, it is a process through which employees are aroused and energized towards an action that would lead to the attainment of the desired goals.

Vinokur, Jayaaratne, and Chess (2004) further argue that employees motivation involves the application of effective motivational processes that will enable workers to become more satisfied and become committed to their assigned tasks.

Researches indicate that money is not the only motivating factor. There are many motivating factors applicable to organizations. Most importantly organizations cannot directly measure motivation. In addition, organizations cannot equate motivation to the performance of the workers.

Employees’ attitudes concerning the organization dedication and occupational fulfillment should be one of the most significant interests in the area of organization conduct and within the applications of human resources management (Lifer, 2004).

In fact, employees’ attitudes directly correlate to occupational contentment and assurance. Conversely, the organization commitment encompasses the general attitude of the employees towards the organization.

Even though the relationship between job satisfaction and organization commitment, current studies indicate that job satisfaction is caused by organization commitment (Sinclair et al., 2005).

Therefore, organizations must find ways through which they can make their workers become committed to the organization in order to be satisfied with their jobs.

Commitment and satisfaction have been treated separately by most of the modern organizations particularly when it comes to practices such as downsizing (Vinokur et al, 2004).

The manner in which employees within the academic institutions understand performance and fulfillment affects the degree to which they become satisfied with their jobs and committed to the organizations (Lifer, 2004).

As indicated, job satisfaction and commitment stems from the organization behavior towards workers. According to the self-regulating premises of motivation, employees will evaluate the organization behavior and make adjustments according to their personal interest.

As an organizational practice, firms must behave in such a manner that motivates their workers.

In fact, employees will evaluate the organizational processes before they finally become committed to the organization. Employees will also feel satisfied with their jobs only after the organization has fulfilled most of their desires.

Therefore, job satisfaction and organization commitment depend on how the desired needs of the employees are met by the organization (Vinokur et al., 2004).

Motivation need and motives premises put a lot of emphasis on the individual needs and values as the basis of the employee’s behavioral differences.

Thus, the organization must understand these need and values of its employees in order to sustain the commitment and satisfaction of their employees to the assigned tasks.

Recent studies and management practices indicate that organizations hardly attain their goals without their employees’ commitment (Lifer, 2004).

As such, organizations within the academic sphere should find ways through which their employees can remain committed to the institution goals. Further, studies indicate that most of these institutions ignore the need of motivating employees to enhance their commitment to their jobs.

The academic institutions should understand that motivation is an individual psychosomatic attribute that brings about some level of personal commitment (Sinclair et al., 2005).

Also, institutions should understand that motivation involves those factors that bring about, guide and maintain the behavior in an exacting dedicated course (Sinclair et al., 2005).

The problem is that most of the institutional managers assume the basics of motivation practices that can enhance the performance of their employees.

Researches indicate that most of the academic institutional managers assume that motivation is critical for enhanced performance of their organizations. Employees in all organizations always have a greater feeling once they are motivated (Lifer, 2004).

Another assumption that academic institutions have about their employees is that motivations directly influences the individual performance.

Besides personal fulfillment, that one can perform a particular task, individual capability, work conditions and the organization’s resources are important factors in the performance (Lifer, 2004).

Academic institutional managers also overlook the replenishment nature of motivation. In other words, motivations in most of these organizations are lacking and need to be adjusted.

Therefore, motivation is a managerial tool that the managers of these institutions can utilize to enhance the performance of their workers. Studies indicate that most of the managers are knowledgeable about what constitutes the drive to work (Sinclair et al., 2005).

Thus, managers should design job assignments and rewards that are ultimately motivational. Motivation is anything that can encourage workers to perform their jobs through the fulfillment of their alluring needs (Sinclair et al., 2005).

Motivation should be goal oriented and be geared towards the attainment of the organization goals.

Even though there has been a lack of commitment in the worker’s motivation in the part of the academic institution’s management, most of them have put in place strategies to ensure their employees are motivated.

As Lifer (2004) observed, the organization success is measured by its capability of creating values that are adequate to recompense the costs the organization has incurred upon the use of its resources.

In all institutions particularly within the academics, workers are looking at the organization to meet and satisfy their needs.

Unless the organizations motivate their worker through satisfying their needs, most of the talented, experienced and creative professionals will transfer to those organizations that take cognizance of the needs and demands of the workers (Vinokur et al., 2004).

However, there are many strategies academic institutions have put in place to ensure that their employees are motivated.

The first strategy is the inclusion of reasonable rewards and good conditions of the work environment. The rewards have always been in the form of proper remunerations commensurate to the individual input and their personal needs and want (Sinclair et al., 2005).

While considering remunerations for workers managers must look into the four elements of the wages structure. These include the job rate, which is associated with the importance of the job. Those employees in technical skills should be paid higher than those with low technical skills.

Similarly, increased remunerations should also be awarded to the employees in higher positions. The second component is the payment according to performance. Increased performances should be well rewarded. The third component relates to the scarcity of a particular skill.

Employees possessing such skills are supposed to be rewarded accordingly (Sinclair et al., 2005).

The final component relates to allowances, pensions, long service as well as fringe benefits. Also included in this category is the work leave and holidays. Organizations should offer better conditions of work even when the personnel are on holiday or in leave (Sinclair et al., 2005).

Most important is the considerations of the prevailing economic circumstances as well as the remunerations other organizations offer. The remunerations should meet the needs of the employees.

The other important motivating factor is money. Even though researches indicate that money is not the ultimate motivating factor, it remains to be critical in managing the worker’s needs. In addition, most of the managers could hardly differentiate wages and money as a form of motivating strategy.

According to Lifer (2004), money remains a significant factor in motivating employees to achieve enhanced performance. In essence, money falls within the proper establishment of the wage system.

As indicated, well-established systems of wages contribute to the worker’s stimulation towards enhanced commitment, performance and by extension their job satisfaction (Sinclair et al., 2005).

Along with what money symbolizes including power, security, and prestige as well as accomplishes, money holds critical motivating power (Vinokur et al., 2004). In the job, process money have the capability of attracting, sustaining and motivating workers towards increased performance.

In other words, employees will always move to similar job preferences where there are greater financial rewards. Money has been used to reward increased performances as well as punishing low performing workers (Vinokur et al., 2004).

In most cases, managers use the fear of not remunerating employees in case of low productivity. On the other hand, higher financial rewards offered in the increased productivity.

The other motivating strategy is staff training. The workers increased productivity depends on the degree of their effectiveness as well as the motivations. Training employees on specific skills is an essential approach in workers motivation.

Education institutions must have good training programs to enhance workers skills (Sinclair et al., 2005). In addition, the institutions must offer opportunities for workers self-improvement.

Self-improvement and development will enable workers to encounter the job challenges as well as the changing requirements. Moreover, self-improvement increases self-actualization that is needed in the job commitment and satisfaction (Sinclair et al., 2005).

The availability of information as well as effective communication also remains an important strategy to motivate workers. Direct and relevant information regarding jobs requirements, the needed productivity levels and performance stimulates the motivation of workers.

Organizations should design effective communication channels that will enhance collaboration and corporation (Vinokur et al., 2004). Effective communication increases competition among workers as well as awareness of the company needs.

As indicated before part of the organization practices relating to motivation is the job commitment and satisfaction. Organizations must find ways through their employees remain committed to their jobs and become satisfied.

Job satisfaction refers to a fulfilling or a positive emotional condition that originates from an individual’s work or profession familiarity as broadly presented by Sinclair et al. (2005). It results from the work force opinion on how good their work provides the things that are seen as significant.

Vinokur, Jayaaratne, and Chess (2004), argues that it is widely acknowledged that work satisfaction is a very significant and often deliberated attitude. Even as Lifer (2004) pointed out that, there are three vital scopes to work fulfillment.

Work satisfaction is a touching reaction to a work condition. Thus, it cannot be observed but conditional. Work pleasure is usually determined by how sound the results meet up or surpass the potential.

For example, a group’s staff will develop a negative feeling towards the job, the manager or colleagues if they sense that their output is higher compared to that of the counterparts in other sections but receive less pay.

Alternatively, if the staff feel that they are being treated in a good manner and remunerated fairly, they are likely to develop an optimistic attitude towards the work (Vinokur et al., 2004).

Work satisfaction signifies a number of linked attributes that are very vital of traits of work in regards to which people have an efficient reaction. These attributes according to the Lifer (2004) are the work itself, earning, promotion prospects, management, and colleagues.

Vinokur, Jayaaratne, and Chess (2004) assert that work satisfaction of the employees, of course, depends on the cost-effectiveness, social and cultural aspects of a country. A difficulty of sustaining a family is likely to face an individual who does not get adequate remuneration.

The crisis puts the workers far-off from being content. In particular, the societal amenities such as transport services, customer cooperative-currency boxes are adequate due to the economic circumstances.

Little pays, class unavailability, and social safety have an effect on enthusiasm. Job satisfaction cannot be a subject of discussion where there is nonexistence of enthusiasm (Sinclair et al., 2005).

Conclusion

Therefore, it can be concluded that motivation is one of the most important management processes particularly when it comes to managing employees. Understanding workers and their significant contribution to organization success is critical for organizations.

In essence, there are closer relations between the organization and the human element. In properly managed organizations, employees are seen as an important resource that immensely contributes to the enhanced productivity and quality.

In fact, in such organizations, employees are considered fundamental for organization development. Also, such organizations consider capital investments after human resources and are seen as a means through which employees can achieve the organization goals.

Further, the effectiveness of the organization is measured by the extent to which it achieves its goals. In the circumstances where the organization values its human resources, it will become effective through inculcating the sense of corporation among employees.

In addition, the organization must ensure that there is motivation, commitment and job satisfaction within its jurisdiction.

For the organization to ensure that there is job commitment and satisfaction among its employees it must put in place effective and strong motivating factors at all levels within its structure.

In academic institutions which were the focus of this study, there has been a lack of commitment to the motivation of workers.

Even though there has been a lack of commitment in the worker’s motivation in the part of the academic institution’s management, most of them have put in place strategies to ensure their employees are motivated.

As observed, the organization success is measured by its capability of creating values that are adequate to recompense the costs the organization has incurred upon the use of its resources.

In all institutions particularly within the academics, workers are looking at the organization to meet and satisfy their needs.

Unless the organizations motivate their worker through satisfying their needs, most of the talented, experienced and creative professionals will transfer to those organizations that take cognizance of the needs and demands of the workers.

References

Lifer, E. (2004). Career surveys, job satisfaction, are you happy in your jobs. Exclusive report. Library Journal, 119(18), 44-49.

Sinclair, R. R., Tucker, J.S., Cullen, J.C., & Wright, C. (2005). Performance differences among four organizational commitment profiles. Journal of Applied Psychology, 90(6), 1280-1287.

Vinokur, K.D., Jayaaratne, S. & Chess, W.A. (2004). Job satisfaction and retention of social workers in public agencies, non-profit agencies and private practice: The impact of work place conditions and motivators. Administration in Social Work, 18(3), 93-121.